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Why Do Onions Make Us Cry?

Onions are one of the most common staple foods around the globe. Ironically, for a vegetable so delicious, they can often be tear-jerkers.

Read on to learn why onions cause your eyes to tear and sting, and what you can do to minimize discomfort.

Why Does Cutting Onions Cause Tearing?

Onions produce a sulfur compound called propyl sulfoxide that is stored in the cells of the onion bulb (the part of the onion we eat). Onions grow underground, where they can be eaten by all types of creatures. This odorous sulfuric compound acts as a deterrent to small animals with big appetites.

When one slices into an onion and breaks open its cells, the sulfur compound is released and mixes with the moisture in the air — turning it into smelly and irritating sulfuric acid. When this chemical rises up and comes in contact with your eyes, it stings!

To keep your eyes from potentially being damaged from this chemical exposure, your brain triggers your eyes to tear and flush out the irritating gas particles. Once enough tears have flushed out the sulfuric acids particles from the eye, clear vision and comfort is usually restored. Although your eyes may sting and feel unpleasant, symptoms are temporary and the sulfuric acid won’t damage your eyes.

How Can I Reduce Eye Discomfort When Chopping Onions?

Most experienced chefs will tell you that chilling your onions in the fridge for at least 30 minutes before slicing them will reduce the amount of tearing they cause. Propyl sulfoxide escapes slower in cooler temperatures, reducing the amount of sulfuric acid in the air.

You can also try cutting the onions at arm’s length, or direct the odorous air away with a small fan. Some say that chopping onions immersed in water also helps. Another option is to wear kitchen goggles to protect your eyes.

Furthermore, try to use fresh onions whenever possible. The longer an onion has been stored, the more likely it will induce tearing and discomfort. Try to avoid slicing near the root end of the bulb, as that area has the highest concentration of sulfuric compounds.

Still Having Eye Problems Out of the Kitchen?

If you frequently suffer from eye irritation — and not just while cutting onions — we can help. At Eye Trends, we treat a wide range of eye conditions and can provide you with the treatment and relief you seek.

For further questions or to schedule an eye exam, call us today.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

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REFERENCES

https://www.britannica.com/story/why-do-onions-make-you-cry

https://theconversation.com/why-do-onions-make-you-cry-129519

What Is Considered A True Eye Emergency?

An eye emergency is defined as a condition requiring prompt medical attention due to a sudden change in ocular health or vision.

Eye trauma, foreign objects in the eye, chemical exposure to the eyes, and ocular infections are all considered eye emergencies and should be treated immediately. Seeking medical care as early as possible can help prevent permanent damage to your vision.

What is Considered an Eye Emergency?

Any sudden onset of symptoms or obvious eye trauma that affects vision is an eye emergency. This can range from severe eye pain or vision loss to chemical exposure. Contact us without delay if you experience any of the following:

  • Eye pain
  • Bleeding of the eye
  • Blood in the white of the eye
  • Swollen or bulging eye
  • Vision loss
  • Double vision
  • New or a sudden increase in eye flashes or floaters
  • Pupils that are not the same size
  • Severe photophobia (light sensitivity)
  • Being hit in the eye
  • Bruising around the eye
  • Eye discharge
  • Suspected eye infection
  • Severe burning, stinging, itching eyes
  • Scratched or cut eye or eyelid
  • Split contact lenses in the eye
  • Foreign object stuck in the eye

If you’re uncertain whether or not your condition is an emergency, contact Eye Trends and let us know what’s going on.

We Can Treat Your Eye Emergencies

Our highly trained staff and capable staff is experienced in treating a wide range of eye emergencies and other eye conditions. While some may choose to visit an emergency room for an eye injury, research shows that most visits to the emergency room for an eye emergency could have been treated by an experienced optometrist.

What’s more, our professional team offers personalized care and individual attention to all of our patients, which is something that you may not receive in an emergency room.

We use the latest technology to thoroughly examine and evaluate eye injuries, infections, and other eye emergencies. If you or a loved one happens to have an eye emergency in Conroe, you can rely on to be there for you.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

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Why is My Eyelid Twitching? What Does It Mean!?

Although there’s an official name for eyelid twitches ― myokymia ― nobody really knows for sure what causes it. Usually, you’ll experience these benign, involuntary twitches in your eyelid, and you won’t be able to make them stop. The lid usually moves every few seconds for a minute or two. Sometimes, it happens in both eyes at the same time.

Eye twitches are typically harmless and painless, and they simply go away on their own, with time. But if the spasms are very strong or persist for a long period, we recommend to book an eye exam at one of our optometry offices in Conroe, The Woodlands, Spring, Greenspoint, Kingwood and Houston. Our eye doctor will evaluate your condition to check that it’s not due to a more serious condition.

What are the most common causes of eye twitches?

  • Alcohol intake
  • Bright light
  • Excess caffeine
  • Fatigue
  • Irritation of the eye surface or inner eyelids
  • Smoking
  • Stress
  • Wind or air pollution

What should I do if my eye twitches don’t go away?

Eye twitches that persist for a long time can have severe effects on your quality of life and interfere with vision. They may point to an eye condition that can be treated, such as blepharitis, light sensitivity, dry eyes or pink eye.

Very rarely, eye twitches are a sign of a brain or nerve disorder, or they are a side effect of certain medications.

Also, there are different types of eye twitches. For example, one type is benign essential blepharospasm, which can appear in adulthood and deteriorate gradually. As it worsens, you may have facial spasms that keep your eyes shut for up to a few hours. This condition is a movement disorder believed to result from a mix of genetic and environmental factors.

If your eye twitches don’t resolve on their own within a few weeks, consult with our eye doctors in Conroe, The Woodlands, Spring, Greenspoint, Kingwood and Houston.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

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Pink Eye? It Could Be Coronavirus

How to prevent conjunctivitis and protect your eyes

When you have a virus, especially one that causes a hacking cough, runny nose, and other symptoms of a common cold or flu, it’s typical for your eyes to also get puffy and red. You may be suffering from viral conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye.

How do viruses get into your eyes?

It’s rather simple. When you’re sick, you can easily transfer viruses to your eyes by sneezing, coughing into your hands, or blowing your nose – and then touching the area around your eye.

The coronavirus – pink eye connection

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), doctors have discovered that COVID-19 can cause conjunctivitis. If you’re standing within six feet of an infected person, and they cough or sneeze, the virus can enter your eye. Alternatively, if someone sneezes and virus particles land on the shopping cart that you take and push around a store, and then you touch your eyes without washing your hands first – you’re giving the virus direct access.

However, despite the apparent ease with which coronavirus can infect eyes, the AAO reports that only about 1 – 3% of all patients with the virus contract pink eye.

Preventing pink eye

Like always, prevention is the most effective medicine! Eye care professionals recommend following these tips to help prevent getting viral conjunctivitis:

  • Wash your hands correctly

The CDC instructs people to wash their hands in accordance with these steps: wet your hands, turn off the tap, apply soap, lather and scrub for 20 seconds, turn on tap and rinse. Air dry your hands, use a disposable paper towel and discard it immediately, or use a clean (not shared) towel.

  • Keep your fingers away from your face

No rubbing or wiping your eyes! Even if you don’t feel any symptoms of coronavirus, it’s essential not to touch any part of your face. To wipe away tears or remove makeup, use a clean tissue.

  • Don’t share your personal things

As generous as you may feel about letting others use your personal items, now’s the time to keep things to yourself. For example, the CDC recommends not sharing eye drops, makeup, makeup brushes, contact lenses cases, pillowcases, or towels. Pink eye is highly contagious.

  • Consider wearing glasses instead of contacts

While there’s currently no evidence to prove that wearing contacts raises your risks of contracting the novel coronavirus, there’s some evidence that shows you can get Covid-19 by touching a contaminated surface and then touching your eyes. In general, contact lenses wearers touch their eyes more often than people who wear eyeglasses, so it may be smart to make a temporary switch from contact lenses to glasses. However, this is only a friendly recommendation and not a hard-and-fast rule. If you prefer to stick with wearing contacts, washing your hands thoroughly can help keep you and your eyes safe.

Treatment for conjunctivitis

Regardless of whether your pink eye is caused by coronavirus or a different virus, there is no treatment for viral conjunctivitis. Usually, it goes away on its own within one to two weeks.

To alleviate your painful symptoms, eye doctors recommend:

  • Taking an over-the-counter pain medication, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen or any anti-inflammatory drug
  • Applying a warm compress on your eye for a few minutes; take care to use a clean wash cloth each time and for each eye
  • Use artificial tears (lubricating eye drops) to soothe your eye irritation; don’t touch the bottle tip to your eye

Are you sick and have pink eye symptoms?

Now is not the time to make a DIY diagnosis. Eye redness, even if you have a virus, doesn’t necessarily indicate that you have conjunctivitis. A wide range of other conditions can lead to the same symptoms. Contact an eye doctor near you for help to figure out what’s causing your eye pain. Don’t visit your eye care practice without calling for guidance first, because extra precautions must be taken with patients who may have COVID-19.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

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First Aid for Eye Injuries

Learn how to treat eye injuries at home, and then visit your eye doctor!

As a rule, all eye injuries must be looked at by a qualified eye doctor. However, knowing how to administer the appropriate first aid without delay can help prevent vision loss until you are able to reach one of our eye care centers in Conroe, The Woodlands, Spring, Greenspoint or Kingwood, Texas.

Here are some first aid guidelines from the eye care professionals at Eye Trends for different types of eye injuries:

Chemical burns

No matter what chemical contacts with your eye, flush your eye out immediately with water or any other drinkable liquid. Best is to hold your eye under a stream of water or pour water into your eye from a clean container. Continue rinsing for about 15 minutes. If you’re wearing contact lenses, flush over the lens (which may dislodge it). Afterwards, don’t bandage your eye. Contact our eye care center near you immediately for further assistance.

Foreign object in the eye

Try to let your tears rinse the item out. Lift your upper eyelid outwards and look down towards your lower eyelid to help dislodge the object. Never rub your eye nor use tweezers or any other tools. See your eye doctor immediately if you cannot easily remove the object.

Blunt trauma injury

If you suffer a blow to your eye, apply a cold compress gently and take an over-the-counter pain medication. If you have pain, blurred vision, one eye that protrudes more than the other, or bleeding in your eye, seek medical eye care immediately.

Cuts of your eye and eyelid

If the object that cut your eye is stuck, do not try to remove it from your eye! Go to the nearest emergency room for urgent eye care. Also, never wash out your eye if there is a cut. Instead, cover it with a hard shield and go to an eye clinic for treatment.

Never assume that your eye injury is harmless. By knowing and practicing the basics of first aid eye care quickly, you can reduce your chances of vision loss and improve the chances of successful healing. We’re here to help you with all types of eye injuries in Conroe, The Woodlands, Spring, Greenspoint and Kingwood, Texas.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

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Dangers of “iPad Eyes” For Children

Should you take your kid’s iPad away to help avoid iPad eye strain?

The rate of myopia (you probably know this condition as “nearsightedness”) is soaring higher and higher among kids in America. Eye strain and dry eyes are also on the rise in children. Could iPads and smartphones be the cause?

Link between eyesight and iPads for Children

When we perform kids’ eye exams in Conroe, The Woodlands, and Spring, Greenspoint, Kingwood, Houston, Texas, our eye doctors diagnose a stronger prescription yearly for many kids with myopia. According to the National Eye Institute, this phenomenon is occurring throughout the entire country – reaching epidemic proportions.

Can iPads cause eye problems in children? One reason for the connection between vision and children’s favorite digital gadgets is the way fun technology discourages outdoor playtime. Nowadays, many kids miss out on kicking or hitting a ball and using their eyes to look into the distance. Instead, they sit on the couch, streaming videos and engaging in handheld combat games. Only near vision is required for these indoor activities.

Blue light emissions

Without exception, blue light is emitted by all digital devices. The dangers of blue light on future eye health have been researched and documented. Overexposure to blue light can put children at an increased risk of early-onset macular degeneration and cataracts in the future.

As the shortest, highest-energy wavelength, blue light also flickers and reduces the visual contrast of computer displays – making it harder for the eye to focus. Eye strain, a classic symptom of computer vision, is a common complaint among adults and children alike who use computers.

Overexposure to artificial blue light, especially in the evening, also messes with kids’ circadian rhythms, making it harder to slip into a restful sleep at night.

While people of all ages can suffer from eye strain and future eye health problems due to blue light, children are particularly vulnerable to problems caused by digital screentime, because their eyes are still developing. Nowadays, it’s not unusual to see young kids at age 3 (or even 2 year old toddlers!) watching videos on a phone or playing computer games. At this early stage of life, their visual system is forming, making the hazards of blue light even more forceful and risky.

How to safeguard kids’ eyes

Just like you slather sunscreen on their skin to block harmful UV rays, you need to protect kids’ eyes from artificial blue light that shines from digital technology. Blue-light blocking shields are available for the phone, computer, or iPad. These guards can reduce the amount of blue light emissions by as much as 70%.

Limiting screen time is an even better solution! According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children 18 months and younger shouldn’t spend any time on a digital device, and kids between 18 months and 2 years should only be allowed minimal access. As children get older, it’s tricky to set a specific amount of daily time – but you should make a strong effort to limit their screen time. Being physical with sports and outdoor play is much healthier for their whole body.

Book an eye exam near you

Children should have a baseline eye exam around age 5 from a qualified pediatric eye doctor. Consideringtoday's spread of technology it's important to help reduce eye strain with iPads. With six offices in Conroe, The Woodlands, and Spring, Greenspoint, Kingwood, Houston, Texas, we offer an experienced eye doctor near you!

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Dilation for Pediatric Eye Exams

Are dilating eye drops necessary for kids?

Children’s eye exams are important for many reasons. Kids need to see clearly to learn and develop. Without sharp vision and a fully functional visual system, children can struggle with reading, writing, playing sports, and socializing confidently. If your kid falls behind in any of these normal parts of growing up, he or she may feel like a failure. Poor self-esteem leads to a mixed bag of problems, including behavioral issues and learning difficulties. So don’t be negligent when it comes to scheduling yearly eye exams for your child!

To ensure that pediatric eye exams are comprehensive and accurate, dilation is usually recommended. This means special dilating eye drops will be inserted to enlarge your child’s pupils. Learn why we perform dilation when your child has an eye exam at one of our Eye Trends offices in Conroe, The Woodlands, Spring, Greenspoint, Kingwood, and Houston, Texas.

Why insert dilating eye drops for a pediatric eye exam?

There are several important reasons for dilation, including:

  • By relaxing the focusing muscles of the eye, theeye doctorcan detect vision disorders and measure refractive error more precisely
  • Wider view of the entire eye structure; dilating eye drops enable the eye doctor to view 15% more of the inside and back of the eye, allowing a more complete evaluation of eye health and certain systemic conditions
  • Young, nonverbal kids cannot provide clear or reliable feedback about their vision, and they don’t always notice problems; dilating eye drops enable a more objective testing process

How are the dilating eye drops delivered?

Your child will tilt their head back and we will quickly place the drops into their eyes. Any excess eye drops will be wiped dry. It takes about 20-25 minutes for dilation to take full effect. During that time, you and your child will sit in the waiting area.

How long does the dilation last?

Typically, kids will have enlarged pupils for several hours. Sometimes (although rarely), the dilation might remain until the next day. If this occurs, it is a normal reaction that depends largely on the type of eye drops used and the color of the kid’s eyes.

What are the side effects of dilating eye drops?

The moment that the drops are applied, some stinging may be felt. But it passes momentarily. Until pupils return to normal size, vision may then be blurry. The effects are not too bothersome for most kids, and they can still function normally. However, they’ll have light sensitivity. To alleviate this problem, wearing sunglasses will be helpful; we’ll provide a pair of disposable sunglasses to wear after the exam. (Kids usually love them!) Generally, children can return to school afterwards, but it’s advised to make teachers aware of blurred vision. Allergic reactions are uncommon, but if they occur, red eyes and eyelid swelling may be experienced.

The value of pediatric eye exams with dilation

In sum, a comprehensive pediatric eye exam with dilation may cause some discomfort or blurriness for your child for a few hours, but this inconvenience is definitely easier for kids to deal with than the potentially life-changing effects of growing up without clear, healthy, and functional vision.


Come visit with your kids! Our eye doctors in Conroe, The Woodlands, and Spring, Greenspoint, Kingwood, Houston, Texas, care about children’s long-lasting vision. We’re experienced in performing pediatric eye exams with dilation for all ages, from babies to teens.

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What Is 20/20 Vision?

If your last eye exam revealed that you have 20/20 vision, you probably walked out of the eye care center with a big smile! It’s a great feeling to be able to see without eyeglasses or contact lenses. However, did you know that 20/20 vision is not the same as having perfect vision? So what is it?

At Eye Trends, when Dr. Inns announces the results of your eye exam, he is reporting on your visual acuity, which is the clarity of your eyesight. These numbers describe how well your eyes can see an object that’s 20 feet away. If you can see it clearly, then your vision is considered “normal” – but not “perfect.” That’s because even if you have 20/20 vision, you could still have problems with peripheral vision, color vision, eye coordination, focusing, or depth perception. To find out your visual acuity and total eye health, book an eye exam with our Conroe, Texas, optometrist near you.

How does my eye doctor test visual acuity?

Typically, every eye exam and vision screening includes having you read the Snellen Eye Chart. This diagnostic tool appears as lines of block letters and numbers printed in progressively smaller sizes. The first line will display one huge letter, such as an “E”, and as you move down the chart row by row, the letters get smaller, and there are more of them per line. The lower down on the chart you can read correctly, the closer you are to being diagnosed with 20/20 vision. The bottom row (eight down) is 20/20 vision.

What if I don’t have 20/20 vision?

Don’t worry, you’re in good company! Statistics say that almost half of US adults don’t have 20/20 vision.

Depending on what your visual acuity is, you may need vision correction with prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses, or LASIK refractive surgery, to help you achieve 20/20 vision, or close to it. But not everyone can get to 20/20 – even with corrective treatment. In other words, some people can only see at 60 feet what others with normal vision can see at 20 feet (=20/60 vision). However, that doesn’t mean you can’t see well enough to function. For example:

  • If our eye care professional detects that you have 20/40 vision, it’s still enough to get a driver’s license.
  • If you have 20/80 vision, you should still be able to read headlines in a newspaper and tell the time on an alarm clock placed 10 feet away.
  • If your visual acuity deteriorates to 20/200 vision, you’ll be classified as legally blind.

Can I have better than 20/20 vision?

Sure, especially if you’re a bird of prey! Falcons see about eight times better than humans, with a visual acuity of about 20/2. All jokes aside, even humans can have vision that’s sharper than 20/20, such as 20/15. That means you can back up five feet during your eye exam and still read the Snellen eye chart the same as a person with normal vision standing five feet closer to the chart.

Why do I need good vision?

There are lots of reasons why it’s smart to invest in good vision by visiting our Conroe eye care center near you for regular eye exams. Don’t underestimate the value of sharp, healthy vision in your life! Here are a few important benefits of 20/20 vision:

  • Reading with ease: reading is essential for day-to-day life, whether you read the newspaper, your smartphone, documents at work, letters and bills, or just want to enjoy a good novel.
  • Comfort: without sharp vision, you’ll need to squint all the time, leading to headaches and muscle strain.
  • Safety: activities such as driving and biking become extremely hazardous if you can’t see. Even if you’re just taking a walk, having sharp visual acuity will help prevent you from tripping and falling.
  • Quality of life: clear eyesight goes far towards your quality of life! Without sharp vision, who knows what scenes and wonderful moments you’ll miss out on?

At Eye Trends, we’ll help you to see the best that you can see! Contact our Conroe, Texas, optometrist to schedule an eye exam near you today.

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Is School Work Causing Computer Vision Syndrome in Your Child?

Eye health tips for students from our Conroe eye doctor

The start of fall means back-to-school for kids of all ages – and our team at Eye Trends wishes everyone a smooth and successful return to the classroom!

When your child enters school after a summer of outdoor fun, many of the summer’s vision hazards are left behind. Yet, that doesn’t mean all eye health risks are eliminated! Nowadays, the majority of learning is computer based – exposing students’ eyes to the pain and dangers of blue light and computer vision syndrome. Fortunately, a variety of helpful devices and smartphone apps are available to block blue light and keep yourchild’s vision safe and comfortable.

To help you safeguard your child’s vision for the upcoming semesters and the long term of life, our Conroe optometrist explains all about computer vision syndrome and how to prevent it.

Symptoms of computer vision syndrome

It’s smart to familiarize yourself with the signs of computer vision syndrome. If your child complains about any of these common symptoms, you can help prevent any lasting vision damage by booking an eye exam with our Conroe eye doctor near you:

  • Eye irritation and redness
  • Neck, shoulder and back pain
  • Blurry vision
  • Dry eyes, due to reduced blinking
  • Headaches

Basics of blue light

Students spend endless hours in front of digital screens, be it a computer monitor, tablet, or smartphone. There is homework to be done, research to be conducted, texting with friends, and movies and gaming during downtime. All of this screen time exposes your child’s eyes to blue light.

Many research studies have demonstrated that flickering blue light – the shortest, highest-energy wavelength of visible light – can lead to tired eyes, headaches, and blurry vision. Additionally, blue light can disrupt the sleep/wake cycle, causing sleep deprivation and all the physical and mental health problems associated with it. As for your child’s future eye health, blue light may also be linked to the later development of macular degeneration and retinal damage.

How to avoid computer vision syndrome

Our Conroe eye doctor shares the following ways to block blue light and protect against computer vision syndrome:

  • Computer glasses, eyeglasses lenses treated with a blue-light blocking coating, and contact lenses with built-in blue light protection are all effective ways to optimize visual comfort when working in front of a screen. These optics reduce eye strain and prevent hazardous blue-light radiation from entering the eyes.
  • Practice the 20-20-20 rule; pause every 20 minutes to gaze at an object that’s 20 feet away for 20 seconds. This simple behavior gives eyes a chance to rest from the intensity of the computer or smartphone screen, preventing eye fatigue.
  • Prescription glasses can be helpful when using a computer for long periods – even for students who don’t generally need prescription eyewear. A weak prescription can take the stress off of your child’s eyes, decreasing fatigue and increasing their ability to concentrate. Our Conroe optometrist will perform a personalized eye exam to determine the most suitable prescription.
  • Moisturize vision with eye drops. One of the most common symptoms of computer vision syndrome is dry eyes, namely because people forget to blink frequently enough. Equip your child with a bottle of preservative-free artificial tears eye drops (available over the counter) and remind them to blink!
  • Blue light filters can be installed on a computer, smartphone, and all digital screens to minimize exposure to blue. A range of helpful free apps are also available for download.
  • Limit screen time for your child each day, or encourage breaks at least once an hour. Typically, the degree of discomfort from computer vision syndrome is in direct proportion with the amount of time your child spends viewing digital screens.
  • Set the proper screen distance. Younger children (elementary school) should view their computer at a half-arm’s length away from their eyes, just below eye level. Kids in middle school and high school should sit about 20 – 28 inches from the screen, with the top of the screen at eye level.

For additional info, book a consultation and eye exam at Eye Trends

When you and your child meet with our Conroe eye doctor, we’ll ask questions about your child’s school and study habits to provide customized recommendations on the most effective ways to stay safe from computer vision syndrome and blue light. Our optometrist stays up-to-date with the latest optic technologies and methods to prevent painful vision and eye health damage from using a computer, so you can depend on us for contemporary, progressive treatment.

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Dr. Inns is a 1982 graduate of the University of Houston College of Optometry. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Wilfred Laurier University, Canada. During his training at the University of Houston, he held positions in research and was a teaching assistant / laboratory instructor.

Postgraduate work includes therapeutic courses at Pennsylvania College of Optometry and the Optometric Glaucoma Specialist Course at the University of Texas Medical School. Dr. Inns has published in Optometry Today and Optometric Management. He also volunteers at the schools in his area.

Dr. Inns and his wife, Lynn, spend much of their spare time calling and visiting with their four boys.

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Amber Draper, Manager

As the manager of The Woodlands office, Amber Draper leads the team with the focus on patient care and assisting with their ophthalmic needs. Having over 10 years experience, Amber can aid patients with the most appropriate lens technology to match their daily needs. Everyone needs at least one pair of sun wear, especially here in Texas.

Amber is a proud graduate of Sam Houston State University with a BA in History, and a minor in Spanish.

In her spare time, she is with family, friends, and enjoying some Houston Texans Football.

Dr. Toups is a 1984 graduate of the University of Houston College of Optometry. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy from Northeast Louisiana University.

Being a therapeutically licensed optometrist, Dr. Toups is trained to diagnose and treat ocular conditions. He specializes in contact lenses and he is current with all refractive surgery procedures.

Dr. Toups is married, has five children and has lived in the Houston area since 1980.

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