Skip to main content

COVID-19 Update: What to Expect in Our Office. Our Commitment to Health and Safety. Read our safety protocols here.

Home »

eye care

How Smartphone Apps Help Low-Income Communities

People who don’t have in-person access to an eye doctor may go years without getting their eyes examined. Now, thanks to smartphone technology, people in low-resource communities or who find it difficult to visit their eye doctor for other reasons can now have access to certain eye exams.

Even if a person doesn’t own a smartphone, volunteers or other people in their community can conduct a simple vision screening test via a phone app. If the app identifies problems, it could signal the need for an in-person eye exam.

Vision Problems Are Not Being Checked

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), about 2.2 billion people globally have a near or distance vision impairment, with rates of unaddressed near vision impairment at greater than 80% in western, eastern and central subregions of Sub-Saharan Africa.

In the United States, only 13% of those experiencing visual symptoms, ranging from poor night vision and blurry vision to red eyes and double vision, visited their eye doctor for an eye exam and treatment.

How Can We Get People to Undergo Annual Eye Exams?

According to a study published in the Lancet Digital Health, using smartphones for eye screening and referrals could triple the number of people seeking primary care for eye disorders and boost the uptake of hospital services in low-resource settings.

This Lancet study, conducted in Kenya, demonstrates how smartphone-based screening allows non-expert community volunteers to visit homes and conduct eye exams, freeing up capacity among specialized eye care services.

While smartphone apps aren’t a substitute for a comprehensive eye exam by an eye doctor, they certainly can help. They may assist in managing ongoing eye conditions and notify the patient when a doctor’s help is required.

By eliminating an initial visit to the eye doctor, patients can get their eyes checked from the comfort of their own home. Only if an eye problem is detected will they need to go visit the eye doctor.

This isn’t to say that people should not go to their eye doctor, but if for some reason it’s financially difficult to go on an annual basis, or they don’t have direct access to an eye doctor, a smartphone app is a great solution.

To learn more about smartphone apps that conduct vision screening tests, contact Eye Trends in Conroe today.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

5 Vision Therapy Myths Debunked

Cataract Awareness Month

School and Vision: 2 Important Partners

FOLLOW US:

Q&A

What can an eye exam app do?

Vision screening apps allow you to measure your visual acuity using your smartphone and help determine whether you need an in-person exam by an eye doctor. The app may measure your lens power, test for color perception and vision distortions, and monitor possible vision changes related to eye conditions and diseases like macular degeneration. It may even locate an eye care provider nearby and enable you to book an appointment.

What can in-person eye exams detect?

A comprehensive eye exam can assess your vision and diagnose eye disease. Eye diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration, can go undetected for years because their symptoms may not become apparent until the condition is at a more advanced stage. Unfortunately, by then it may be too late to prevent irreversible vision loss and even blindness.

4 Ways COVID Precautions Can Affect the Eyes

There is no question that mask-wearing and social distancing have helped slow the spread of COVID-19, but eye doctors say these precautions may be contributing to the rise in cases of computer eye strain, dry eye syndrome and other eye conditions.

Since the onset of COVID-19, eye doctors are seeing more cases of:

1. Dry Eye Syndrome

While wearing a mask is essential to prevent the spread of COVID-19, masks can also cause uncomfortable dry eye symptoms.

The constant flow of exhaled air that flows through the top of a mask can dry out our eyes, causing symptoms like redness and irritation.

To minimize the problem, take frequent breaks from mask-wearing, if at all possible, and choose masks with a pliable nose piece to help prevent the air from escaping through the top of the mask and into your eyes.

In addition to mask-related dry eye, many people who work from home have developed dry eye as a result of increased screen time.

According to research, when working on a computer or even scrolling through social media on our smartphones, we tend to blink less often, so our eyes are less lubricated.. .

2. Computer Vision Syndrome

Working and studying at home due to COVID restrictions has caused a significant increase in digital device usage, and a condition eye doctors call computer vision syndrome. Symptoms include dry, itchy burning eyes (dry eye syndrome) as well as headaches and focusing difficulties.

3. Myopia

With all the time spent working and learning from home and the drastic increase in screen time due to COVID lockdowns, it’s not a surprise that eye doctors have seen an increase in the number of patients with worsening myopia.

Studies have found that children who spend a significant amount of time doing “near work” like reading and looking at digital devices have a greater risk of developing myopia and experiencing myopia progression than children who spend much more time playing outdoors.

Encourage your children to spend at least 2 hours a day in the sunshine while wearing sunglasses and sunscreen.

4. Eye Injuries

Eye injuries and accidents, most commonly corneal abrasions (scratches) have increased during COVID lockdowns, as more people have tackled home improvement projects.

Unfortunately, many of these do-it-yourselfers didn’t wear protective eyewear.

Common symptoms of eye injuries include pain, tearing, blurred vision, sensitivity to light, blood in the eye and even vision loss in severe cases.

It is important to seek immediate treatment if you or anyone in your household has sustained an eye injury, to prevent vision loss.

What can you do to protect your eyes and vision?

    1. Hydrate. Hydration is not only important for keeping your body healthy and energized, but can also keep your eyes moist and well lubricated.
    2. Artificial tears. These eye drops can help to replenish your tears and lubricate your eyes to prevent dry eye from occurring.
  • Practice the 20-20-20 rule. Every 20 minutes, look at an object at least 20 feet away, for at least 20 seconds. This will help your eye muscles to relax and prevent eye strain.
  1. Blink frequently. It is important to consciously remind yourself to blink often while you are working at your computer. Also, be sure to close your eyes completely upon blinking to give your eyelids a chance to properly spread your tears across the surface of your eye.
  2. Increase your Omega-3 intake. Omega-3 fatty acids that can be found in fish oil and certain nuts have been shown to reduce inflammation— a common cause of dry eye. If you want to be sure you are getting enough omega in your diet, ask your doctor about starting an omega-3 supplement.

If you notice any changes in your eye health or vision, call Eye Trends in Conroe today to schedule an appointment for an eye exam and to discuss how you can protect your eyes and vision from the effects of COVID.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

Can Vision Therapy Help Myopia?

How Long Does It Take to Get Used to New Glasses?

Dealing with Your Tween’s and Teen’s Eyesight

FOLLOW US:

How’s Your Hand-Eye Coordination?

People with poor hand-eye coordination are sometimes perceived as clumsy or inattentive. The truth is that poor hand-eye coordination stems from a deficit in visual-motor coordination. Fortunately, your eye doctor will assess your coordination during a comprehensive eye exam.

What Is Hand-Eye Coordination?

Hand-eye coordination is a person’s ability to smoothly control their hand movements based on the visual cues they receive from the brain. When the eyes and brain are communicating effectively, a person’s hand-eye coordination can be drastically improved. Many activities, from driving a car to catching a ball, depend on our visual system working at its best.

Here’s how it works: Our eyes capture what they see around them, and send this visual information to the brain. The brain processes and interprets these images, and then communicates with our hands and arms, informing them of the object’s position, speed, size and many other parameters.

This process is very complex and must work seamlessly for our hands to react quickly to visual stimuli. Having good hand-eye coordination can be the difference between turning the steering wheel away from an encroaching car to avoid an accident, or being hit by that car.

We all utilize hand-eye coordination multiple times throughout the day when doing things like:

  • Writing
  • Driving
  • Typing
  • Playing a video game
  • Exercising or playing sports
  • Inserting a credit card into a chip reader

When the visual and motor systems don’t communicate efficiently, a person may experience symptoms like clumsiness at the very least, and professional, academic or developmental challenges at the worst. For example, poor hand-eye coordination can interfere with typing skills, attention and handwriting.

Even a person with perfect visual acuity (eyesight) and great motor skills can experience poor hand-eye coordination. That’s because the problem usually isn’t with the individual systems, but rather how the brain, eyes and the body interact with each other.

Eye Exams Can Detect Problems With Visual Skills

Assessing hand-eye coordination is crucial for both adults and children, as this skill greatly impacts most parts of life.

At your comprehensive eye exam, your optometrist will check several visual skills, including hand-eye coordination. If a problem with hand-eye coordination or any other visual skill is found, Dr. Inns will discuss the next steps in treating and correcting the problem.

To schedule an eye exam for you or your child, call Eye Trends in Conroe today!

Q&A

#1: What other visual skills are evaluated during an eye exam?

During an eye exam, your optometrist will test for visual acuity, convergence, eye tracking, eye teaming, color vision, and focusing. Testing these skills is especially important for school-aged children, since learning and academic performance heavily depend on healthy vision.

#2: How often do you need a comprehensive eye exam?

Adults should have their eyes examined by an optometrist every year, or as frequently as their optometrist recommends. Children should have their eyes first checked at 6-12 months of age and then as frequently as advised by the optometrist. As a rule, most children should be seen when they are 2 or 3 years old, before first grade and then every year thereafter.

If you have any concerns about your child’s vision or are yourself due for an eye exam, contact us today. We want what’s best for your vision and life!

3 Reasons Sports Vision Training Can Improve Your Game

Are you serious about sports or more of a weekend athlete? Either way, sports vision training can help! It’s an effective way to boost the visual skills you need to excel at your chosen sport, and stay safe while doing it.

Vision therapy trains the brain to achieve maximum efficiency in the way it processes and responds to visual input. Sports vision training teaches professional and other athletes to process what they see faster and more accurately. At Eye Trends we offer sports vision training, so contact us to learn more about how it can help you improve your game.

Sports Vision Is Important for Athletes

Strong and well-developed visual skills can help you improve your catching, throwing, and hitting skills, so you can excel in games such as football, baseball, basketball, hockey, and golf — in fact just about any sport!. Sharpening your tracking, focusing, peripheral awareness, and depth perception skills will help you determine the distance between a tennis ball and the net, or the proximity of another player as you run to first base. It’s no wonder that vision training helps athletes get an edge over their competitors.

Here are 3 ways sports vision can improve your game:

Improve your attention, focus, and concentration

Enhancing your ability to focus can boost your ability to concentrate. Eye focusing skills enable you to refocus your vision quickly and more accurately, so you can process moving objects, such as a ball, or players on a field, faster.

Hand-eye coordination

For optimum hand-eye coordination, your eyes must be able to focus on objects and track their motion as efficiently as possible. Whether it’s tracking a ball while you’re at-bat or throwing a ball to another player, the faster and more accurately your eyes perceive the object and convey this information to your brain, the faster your hands and the rest of your body can act on this information.

Peripheral Awareness and Depth Perception

Peripheral awareness training teaches you how to view objects and people from the “corners” of your eyes, expanding your peripheral vision.

If your brain isn’t using both eyes’ input equally, you may have trouble estimating distance or perceiving three-dimensional depth. Through depth perception training, your brain and eyes learn to perceive the distance of traveling objects, such as balls, so you can take action accordingly.

The sharper your vision, the better you can become in whatever sport you play. Your eye doctor will test your vision in specific areas to identify weak spots that need strengthening. Afterward, you’ll progress through a series of customized eye exercises and tests to strengthen your skills in those areas, in order to improve your game.

At Eye Trends in , The Woodlands, Spring, Greenspoint, Kingwood, and Houston, we offer sports vision training for eye focusing, peripheral awareness, depth perception and many other visual skills. To learn more about how sports vision training can help you become a better athlete, contact Dr. Lisa Roach today!

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

How One Football Player Became a Pro Thanks To Sports Vision Training

Are Face Masks Causing Dry Eye Symptoms?

Don’t Do These 11 Things If You Wear Daily Disposable Contacts!

FOLLOW US:

4 Common Myopia Myths Debunked

4 Common Myopia Myths Debunked 640Myopia (nearsightedness) occurs when the eye elongates and rays of light entering the eye are focused in front of the light-sensitive retina rather than directly on it.

It’s by far the most common refractive error among children and young adults.

To help understand and learn more about what myopia means for your child’s vision, we’ve debunked 4 common myopia myths.

Myth: Myopia only develops in childhood

Fact: While it’s true that in most cases nearsightedness develops in childhood, it can also develop during one’s young adult years.

Myth: Wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses cause myopia to worsen

Fact: Prescription eyeglasses and contact lenses in no way exacerbate myopia. Optical corrections help you see comfortably and clearly. Another common misconception is that it’s better to use a weaker lens power than the one prescribed by your eye doctor. This is simply not true. By wearing a weaker lens you are contradicting the purpose of using corrective eyewear, which is to comfortably correct your vision.

Myth: Taking vitamins can cure myopia

Fact: Vitamins have been proven to slow the progression of or prevent some eye conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or cataracts. However, no vitamin has been shown to prevent or cure myopia. All vitamins and supplements should only be taken under the advice of your healthcare professional.

Myth: There is no way to slow the progression of myopia.

Fact: There are a few ways to slow down the progression of myopia:

Get more sunlight. Studies have shown that children who spend more time playing outdoors in the sunlight have slower myopia progression than children who are homebodies.

Take a break. Doing close work, such as spending an excessive amount of time looking at a digital screen, reading, and doing homework has been linked to myopia. Encouraging your child to take frequent breaks to focus on objects farther away can help. One well-known eye exercise is the 20-20-20 rule, where you take a 20-second break to view something 20 feet away every 20 minutes.

Other options to slow myopia progression include:

  • Orthokeratology/Ortho-k. These are specialized custom-fit contact lenses shown to decrease the rate of myopia progression through the gentle reshaping of the cornea when worn overnight.
  • Multifocal lenses offer clear vision at various focal distances. Studies show that wearing multifocal soft contact lenses or multifocal eyeglasses during the day can limit the progression of myopia compared to conventional single vision glasses or contact lenses.
  • Atropine drops. 1.0% atropine eye drops applied daily in one eye over a period of 2 years has shown to significantly reduce the progression of myopia

Prevent or slow the progression of your child’s myopia with myopia management. Contact The Myopia Control Center At Eye Trends to book your child’s consultation today!

The Myopia Control Center At Eye Trends serves patients from Houston, Spring, Woodlands, and Conroe, all throughout Texas.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Inns

Q: Can myopia be cured?

  • A: Currently, there is no cure for myopia. However, various myopia management methods can slow its progression.

Q: How much time should my child spend outdoors to reduce the risk of myopia?

  • A: Make sure your child spends at least 90 minutes a day outdoors.


The Myopia Control Center At Eye Trends serves patients from Houston, Spring, Woodlands, and Conroe, all throughout Texas.

 

Request a Myopia Management Appointment
Want To Discuss Myopia? Call Our Offices!

Common Visual Symptoms to Watch for in Children

kid playing outside 640People often believe that if a child has 20/20 vision, they have perfect eyesight. This isn’t always the case. Having 20/20 eyesight refers to the ability to see clearly from 20 feet away. This doesn’t guarantee that a child has the visual skills needed to read properly, pay attention in class, writing, and other tasks required for academic success.

It may surprise you that many students who show signs of a learning difficulty actually have a vision problem. According to the National PTA, approximately 10 million school-age children suffer from vision problems that make it more difficult for them to learn in a classroom setting.

If your child is struggling in school, Dr. Lisa Roach can determine whether the problem is related to their vision and provide a vision therapy program to help them succeed.

Vision Screenings vs Comprehensive Eye Exam

While school vision screenings might detect significant lazy eye or myopia, they miss many other vision problems, such as issues with focusing, depth perception, or eye tracking.

A comprehensive eye exam, on the other hand, checks for farsightedness, nearsightedness, astigmatism, eye focusing abilities, eye tracking, eye focusing, visual skills, binocular eye coordination, and visual processing.

What Signs Should Parents and Teachers Look For?

Below is a list of signs and symptoms indicating that a child may be experiencing vision difficulties:

  • Difficulty paying attention
  • Complains of frequent headaches
  • Difficulty with comprehension
  • Complains of double or blurry vision
  • Makes errors when copying from the board
  • Reads below grade level
  • Holds reading material close to the face
  • Reverses words or letters while reading or writing
  • Loses place or skips words when reading
  • Confuses or omits small words while reading
  • Rubs eyes
  • Slow to finish written assignments
  • Frequently squints
  • Tilts head or covers one eye
  • Spelling difficulties
  • Uses finger pointing when reading

How Does Vision Therapy Help?

Vision therapy is a personalized treatment program designed to strengthen and improve your child’s visual skills.

Each vision therapy program is customized to your child’s needs and may include specialized lenses, filters, or prisms, alongside personalized eye exercises to help retrain the brain-eye connection and improve your child’s school performance.

If you think a vision problem may be affecting your child’s academic performance, vision therapy may provide them with the necessary visual skills to succeed in school.

Frequently Asked Questions with Our Vision Therapist in Houston, Texas

Q: How do vision problems impact learning?

  • A: A child’s vision problem can impact all aspects of learning. Often, children with vision problems are told they have a learning difficulty, when in fact, their brain isn’t properly processing what their eyes see. Vision problems can affect a child’s reading skills and comprehension, handwriting, spelling, classroom performance, concentration and attention, and visual skills.

Q: Does my child have a vision problem?

  • A: Discovering a vision problem in children can be difficult, as they may lack the verbal skills to describe what they’re experiencing or may not realize that they have a vision problem.Common indicators that your child may have a vision problem include:
    – Covering one eye
    – Behavioral problems
    – Reading avoidance
    – Difficulties with reading comprehension
    – Frequent blinking
    – Excessive fidgeting
    – Limited attention span
    – Reading below school grade level
    – Tilting head to one side



If your child displays any of these signs, make sure you set up a visit to an eye doctor at Vision Therapy Center At Eye Trends to evaluate their visual skills and find out whether your child could benefit from vision therapy.

Vision Therapy Center At Eye Trends serves patients from Houston, Spring, Woodlands, and Conroe, all throughout Texas.

Request A Vision Therapy Appointment
Find Out If Vision Therapy Can Help You! Call Our Offices!

4 Macular Degeneration Myths You Should Know About

Can you recognize a myth about age-related macular degeneration (AMD)? Considering it’s a leading cause of blindness and vision loss, it’s pretty important to get the facts straight.

AMD occurs when the center portion of the retina, called the macula, becomes damaged. Both forms of AMD (wet and dry) can lead to vision loss, but wet AMD is more severe and, thankfully, less common.

Below, we’ll explore 4 common myths about AMD, and what science really has to say about the matter.

Myth #1: Macular Degeneration Has Noticeable Early Symptoms

Fact: Most people who are diagnosed with AMD don’t realize they have it. In its early stages, AMD produces only slight, sometimes imperceptible symptoms that are easy to miss.

Early symptoms of AMD include blurry central vision. It can also make straight lines appear distorted.

So, don’t skip your annual comprehensive eye exam — it’s the only sure way to detect AMD, even without any present symptoms.

Myth #2: AMD Always Leads To Total Blindness

Fact: Since AMD affects only the macula, only central vision is affected. Even people with severe vision loss due to AMD will have peripheral vision, although considered legally blind.

However, with the right treatments and lifestyle changes, people with AMD are able to somewhat control and curb the rate of vision loss, sometimes stopping its progression entirely.

Myth #3: Your Diet and Lifestyle Don’t Impact AMD

Fact: Studies have shown that people who consume a healthy diet supplemented by certain vitamins have a lower risk of developing AMD. Recommended: a diet rich in green leafy vegetables, and vitamins C and E, zinc, lutein and zeaxanthin.

Lifestyle factors like smoking, exercise, and diet all impact eye health in various ways, making it all the more important to eat your greens, hit the gym, and kick smoking.

Myth #4: There are No Treatments for AMD

Fact: While nothing can be done to reverse AMD vision loss once it has occured, much can be done to stop AMD in its tracks — or at least slow it down.

At Eye Trends, we can assessyour eyes and recommend the best course of treatment to prolong healthy and clear vision for as long as possible.

To schedule your annual comprehensive eye exam, contact us at one of our convenient locations in Conroe, The Woodlands, Spring, Greenspoint, Kingwood, and Houston.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

Top 5 Tips for Managing Eye Allergies This Spring

How Much Time Should My Child Spend Outdoors?

Tips to Relax Your Eyes

FOLLOW US:

Refs

https://www.healthcentral.com/slideshow/amd-myths

https://www.healthgrades.com/right-care/eye-health/5-myths-about-macular-degeneration

What You Should Know About Night Blindness

If you don’t see well while driving at night, there’s a chance you have night blindness. Night blindness, or nyctalopia, is the inability to see well at night or in dim lighting. It’s not considered an eye disease, but rather a symptom of an underlying problem.

Our eye doctor in Conroe can help diagnose, manage and treat your night blindness with specialized digital eye exams, so that you can enjoy being out and about at night again.
Here are 4 things you should know about night blindness:

Causes of Night Blindness

The inability to see well at night can be the result of a condition such as:

    • Vitamin A Deficiency — Vitamin A helps keep your cornea, the layer at the front of your eye, clear; it’s also an important component of rhodopsin, a protein that enables you to see in low light conditions. Although uncommon in North America, deficiency of this vitamin can induce night blindness.
    • CataractsA buildup of protein clouds the eye’s lens, leading to impaired vision, especially at night and in poor lighting conditions.
    • Diabetic RetinopathyDamage to the eyes’ blood vessels and nerves can result in vision loss, including difficulty seeing at night.
    • GlaucomaThis group of eye diseases is associated with pressure build-up in the eye that damages the optic nerve. Both glaucoma and the medications used to treat it can cause night blindness.
    • MyopiaAlso called nearsightedness, myopia makes distant objects appear blurry, and patients with it describe a starburst effect around lights at night.
    • KeratoconusAn irregularly shaped cornea causes blurred vision and may involve sensitivity to light and glare which tend to be worse at night.
    • Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP)A progressive genetic eye disease which can be associated with other diseases, RP leads to night blindness and peripheral vision loss.
    • Usher SyndromeThis genetic condition causes both hearing loss and vision loss, including night blindness and RP, mentioned above.

Symptoms of Nyctalopia

Since night blindness is a symptom of some serious vision problems, it’s important to get your eyes checked regularly to ensure that everything is in good working order. Contact your eye doctor as soon as possible if you notice that you don’t see as well in dim light as you used to, such as when driving at night or when adjusting from being outdoors in the sunshine to being indoors.

Symptoms of Night Blindness Include:

  • Reduced contrast sensitivity
  • Difficulty seeing people outdoors at night
  • Difficulty seeing in places with dim lighting, like a movie theater
  • Trouble adapting to the dark while driving
  • Excessive squinting at night
  • Trouble adjusting from bright areas to darker ones

Treatments for Night Blindness

Your eye doctor will want to diagnose the cause of your night blindness in order to treat it. For example, in the rare case of vitamin A deficiency, it can be treated with vitamin supplements and vitamin-A rich foods; myopia can be corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses. Other conditions may require medications or surgery.

If night blindness is caused by a birth defect, Usher syndrome, or retinitis pigmentosa, low vision aids and devices can help you make the most of your remaining vision.

Prevention

While there is no proven way to prevent night blindness resulting from genetic conditions or birth defects, consuming healthy, nourishing foods and taking certain vitamin supplements may prevent or slow the onset of some eye conditions that cause night blindness.

If you experience poor vision at night or in dim lighting, we can help. Contact Eye Trends in Conroe to schedule your appointment today.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Michael D. Toups

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Conroe, Texas. Visit Eye Trends for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

What is an Optometric Glaucoma Specialist?

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the United States and worldwide. Glaucoma is an eye disease that damages the optic nerve and can result in blindness and vision loss. Early detection and treatment can protect your eyes against serious vision loss.

Although many optometrists can diagnose glaucoma, the sight-threatening disease is best managed by an optometric glaucoma specialist.

What is a Glaucoma Specialist?

An optometrist is trained and licensed to treat eye diseases and write prescriptions as needed, in addition to diagnosing the need for visual corrections such as glasses, contact lenses, and refractive surgery.

An optometric glaucoma specialist is an optometrist who has undergone additional training specific to treating patients with glaucoma.

A glaucoma specialist can prescribe oral medications in addition to the topical ophthalmic medications prescribed by a therapeutic optometrist.

Who Treats Glaucoma?

Most optometrists and glaucoma specialists can diagnose and treat glaucoma. Diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma is a key part of training for optometrists.

Part of every comprehensive eye exam includes measurement of eye pressure and checks the optic nerve. With the results of the exam, most ophthalmologists and optometrists are able to make an initial assessment and can determine whether you have glaucoma. Treatment generally begins with medications to reduce eye pressure.

A glaucoma specialist can determine the specific stage of your disease, estimate your risk for vision loss and blindness, and decide whether to initiate treatment.

Contact our locations to learn more about glaucoma and schedule a comprehensive eye exam.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

Protect Your Child’s Eyes with Sports Glasses

COVID-19 –  What Constitutes an Eye Care Emergency? 

Vision Insurance

FOLLOW US:

Why Do Onions Make Us Cry?

Onions are one of the most common staple foods around the globe. Ironically, for a vegetable so delicious, they can often be tear-jerkers.

Read on to learn why onions cause your eyes to tear and sting, and what you can do to minimize discomfort.

Why Does Cutting Onions Cause Tearing?

Onions produce a sulfur compound called propyl sulfoxide that is stored in the cells of the onion bulb (the part of the onion we eat). Onions grow underground, where they can be eaten by all types of creatures. This odorous sulfuric compound acts as a deterrent to small animals with big appetites.

When one slices into an onion and breaks open its cells, the sulfur compound is released and mixes with the moisture in the air — turning it into smelly and irritating sulfuric acid. When this chemical rises up and comes in contact with your eyes, it stings!

To keep your eyes from potentially being damaged from this chemical exposure, your brain triggers your eyes to tear and flush out the irritating gas particles. Once enough tears have flushed out the sulfuric acids particles from the eye, clear vision and comfort is usually restored. Although your eyes may sting and feel unpleasant, symptoms are temporary and the sulfuric acid won’t damage your eyes.

How Can I Reduce Eye Discomfort When Chopping Onions?

Most experienced chefs will tell you that chilling your onions in the fridge for at least 30 minutes before slicing them will reduce the amount of tearing they cause. Propyl sulfoxide escapes slower in cooler temperatures, reducing the amount of sulfuric acid in the air.

You can also try cutting the onions at arm’s length, or direct the odorous air away with a small fan. Some say that chopping onions immersed in water also helps. Another option is to wear kitchen goggles to protect your eyes.

Furthermore, try to use fresh onions whenever possible. The longer an onion has been stored, the more likely it will induce tearing and discomfort. Try to avoid slicing near the root end of the bulb, as that area has the highest concentration of sulfuric compounds.

Still Having Eye Problems Out of the Kitchen?

If you frequently suffer from eye irritation — and not just while cutting onions — we can help. At Eye Trends, we treat a wide range of eye conditions and can provide you with the treatment and relief you seek.

For further questions or to schedule an eye exam, call us today.

At Eye Trends, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 936-206-7366 or book an appointment online to see one of our Conroe eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Inns

Q: What exactly is glaucoma?

  • A: Glaucoma is a condition in which the eye’s intraocular pressure (IOP) is too high. This means that your eye has too much aqueous humor in it, either because it produced too much, or because it’s not draining properly. Other symptoms are optic nerve damage and vision loss. Glaucoma is a silent disease that robs the patient of their peripheral vision. Early detection is very important.

Q: What’s the difference between vision insurance and eye insurance?

  • A: Vision insurance” really isn’t insurance, but rather a benefit that covers some of your costs for eyewear and eye care. It is meant to be used for “routine” care when you aren’t having a problem but want to be sure everything is OK, like having an annual screening exam with your Primary Care Physician. It often, but not always, includes a discount or allowance toward glasses or contact lenses. It is usually a supplemental policy to your medical health insurance. Medical health insurance covers, and must be used when an eye health issue exists. This includes pink eye, eye allergies, glaucoma, floaters, cataracts, diabetes, headaches, and many other conditions. Blurry vision is covered medically if it relates to a medical condition, for example the development of a cataract. For some reason, however, it is considered non-medical if the only finding is the need for glasses or a change of prescription. Of course you can’t know this until you have the exam. In this case, with vision coverage, you would only be responsible for your co-pay, but with medical coverage without vision coverage, you’d be responsible for the usual charge.

Q: How does high blood pressure affect vision?

  • A: If the blood pressure is very high it can be called malignant hypertension and cause swelling of the macula and acute loss of vision. Otherwise hypertension can cause progressive constriction of the arterioles in the eye and other findings. Usually high blood pressure alone will not affect vision much, however hypertension is a known risk factor in the onset and/or progression of other eye disease such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and macular degeneration as well as blocked veins and arteries in the retina or nerve of the eye that can severely affect vision.

What’s the Best Way to Clean Your Eyeglasses?

Why Myopia Is Much More Than An Inconvenience

6 Common Myths About Glaucoma

FOLLOW US:

REFERENCES

https://www.britannica.com/story/why-do-onions-make-you-cry

https://theconversation.com/why-do-onions-make-you-cry-129519

Call Our Offices